flu shots pic

See if this opinion piece by Arthur L. Caplan, Ph.D. gets you all riled up, too…

“Mandating Flu Shots Is the Moral Choice”

Excerpts:

“The battle over vaccination has taken a fascinating new twist in Rhode Island, where the Department of Health has proposed a policy under which all children between 6 months and 5 years of age would have to be vaccinated against the flu before entering daycare or preschool.”

“The government telling parents what to do when it comes to their children’s health is hardly new. They do it a lot — from mandating car seats to banning lead paint and requiring childproof caps on drugs and pesticides. For parents who balk when it comes to science and safety, the state has a legitimate interest in overriding bad choices that can be fatal.”  (Click here to read the whole article.)

Once I read it, I couldn’t let it go, the misinformation and false guilt is so WRONG.  In that second excerpt his comparisons aren’t even CLOSE to apples to apples!  Mandating car seats, banning lead paint, and requiring childproof caps on drugs and pesticides CAUSE NO HARM, they are SAFETY precautions NOT DRUGS which all have SIDE EFFECTS and CLEAR RISKS!  Please forgive all the caps, but that’s what happens when I get goin’…

So I consulted with David, my friend, Jill’s, husband, who was forced into becoming an expert on this topic.

Read more about his story in this guest post that Jill wrote a while back: 

Thankfully it riled up David, too, and he has allowed me to share his rebuttal here…

Arthur Caplan, in his opinion piece, notes that the state of RI Department Of Health has proposed a new policy which would require children between 6 months and 5 years of age to be vaccinated against the flu before entering preschool.

I am at times speechless that the flu shot has generated such debate given the poor science used to support it.

That we live in a country where laws and/or policies can be passed under the guise of science with all dissenters banished from the conversation, silenced, including parents. So much so now that even the ACLU has been stirred to action, as this issue was never really about health, which is why errant laws and policies have had to be enacted; it is about control.

No longer is our healthcare a personal choice or even a parental one, rather our kind and loving government has become our father and mother and will now be making our healthcare decisions for us.

As to some of the information cited in the opinion piece:

1.) Odds: There are over 200 viral strains that have similar effects on the body-fever, headache, fatigue/weakness, body aches, chills, sweating, runny nose, and or a sore throat. These viruses are indistinguishable from one another outside of a nasal or blood test. Flu shots or mists are only purportedly effective against 3 (trivalent) to 4 (quadrivalent) strains of the above noted viruses. So odds are low that one actually has influenza to begin with (80-90% of the time, what we call “the flu” is actually flu-like illness). If you were a betting individual, you would not find the odds in favor of catching influenza, but keep reading….

2.) Morbidity (injury) and mortality: Flu deaths have declined significantly over the past 70 years–in spite of three recognized pandemics–to 0.56 per 100,000, and in spite of widespread flu shot use only beginning in the 80’s (P. Doshi 2008). Between 1997-2013 laboratory confirmed flu in the US was found to be positive in approximately 16% of samples (P. Doshi, Influenza: marketing vaccine by marketing disease 2013). In the state of Texas during the 2012-2013 flu season there were greater than 54,000 samples tested (meaning that 54,000 people were suspected of having the flu) but only 16.7% of the samples tested positive for influenza (Texas Department of State Health Services 2013). The CDC notes through “October 1, 2013 and January 18, 2014, 4,615 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations were reported.” (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Influenza Division 2014) or 17 hospitalizations/100,000 individuals in the US. The severity, frequency and deaths rates from the flu do not warrant legislative or policy actions such as what we are seeing presently. Something just doesn’t add up here.

3.) Statistical spin: Vaccines are tested through randomized control (RCT’s) and observational studies. Findings of how well a vaccine works is reported as “vaccine efficacy” in an RCT and “vaccine effectiveness” in an observational study. When the CDC reports that the flu shot is 64% effective it does not mean what you or I might think it means. When I first read that statistic, the first thought crossing through my mind was that if I were to get the shot I would be 64% less likely to contract the flu. Not true. Three terms that are critical to understanding flu shot science:

a. Event rate: how often something happens. For instance, flu rates between vaccinated and unvaccinated groups.

b. Absolute risk reduction: the difference between event rates. Meaning, if the event rate of the vaccinated group was 1/100 (1% of the group contracted the flu) and the non-vaccinated group was 2/100 (2% of the group contracted the flu). The absolute risk reduction would be 2-1=1%. In this case there would be a 1% risk reduction from the intervention. Whenever the event rate is low (recall that only ~16% of suspected influenza tests positive for influenza=low event rate) the absolute risk reduction is also low.

c. Relative Risk reduction: statistical spin. Take the difference between the two groups and express it as a proportion of the event rate, or %. In the above example, the relative risk reduction would be 50% (2-1=1/2=50%)

When the CDC says that the vaccine effectiveness rate is 64 % they are not reporting absolute risk as we would hope, rather they are citing relative risk. Meaning, what really happened wasn’t that impressive. Observational studies are rife with problems that can’t be controlled, the biggest of which is healthy user bias (what did the two groups do outside of the intervention vs. nonintervention to help reduce their risk contracting the flu — hand washing, eating healthy, avoiding sick individuals, vitamin D…etc.) Unfortunately, observational studies are the only type of studies allowed in this area as the CDC notes:

“The most common approach now used to evaluate how well licensed influenza vaccines work is an observational or vaccine effectiveness study. Once an influenza vaccine has been licensed by FDA, recommendations are typically made by CDC’s Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) for its routine use. For example, ACIP now recommends annual influenza vaccination for all U.S. residents aged 6 months and older. These universal vaccine recommendations make it unethical to perform efficacy (i.e., experimental randomized) studies with persons who are explicitly recommended to receive vaccine, especially because assigning people to a placebo group could place them at risk for serious complications from influenza.”  (Centers for Disease Prevention and Prevention-Flu vaccine effectiveness 2013).

We may never know the true effect of the flu shot based upon the above; hence, legislation and policy forcing vaccinations.  Hmmm…

4.) Does it work or cause harm? It may actually make you sicker, more likely to contract the flu the following season, increase your risk of contracting a flu requiring medical intervention…etc. The FDA requires that the package inserts of all of the flu shots or mists state the there have not been safety or efficacy studies on pregnant women and in some cases nursing mothers as well.

Where are the efficacy and safety studies for all of the 6 month olds? Vaccine injuries are on the rise.

The Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines (ACIV) notes that awards for fiscal year 2010 “dramatically increased to $179 million, more than double the several years before.” (Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines 2011). The number of case filings between 2008 and 2010 has tripled due to the increase in flu shot and human papillomavirus vaccine injury claims with a close to 40% increase in the number of adult-filed claims due to the increase in flu shot utilization (Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines 2011). In the first quarter of fiscal year 2011, 39% of the cases submitted for review were from the flu shot with 30% of the injuries reported being from Guillian Barre Syndrome (Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines 2011). Not to mention, where are the studies looking at the long-term effect of 80+ flu shots over the course of a lifetime?

This could go on. For example, vaccine-induced herd immunity (several studies have found that there is no such thing), informed consent vs. coercion (certainly implied in this case), not to mention the serious issue of pharmaceutical corruption (Ethics-Harvard 2013). Bottom line: the flu is over-marketed and the flu shot does not work as advertised. Consequently, parents that care for and love their kids are much more capable of making their healthcare decisions than an enacted law or policy when they have the truth to work with.

I am of the opinion that the moral choice is to allow for the truth and then let parents make their own decisions for their children.

Do you agree with David?  Let us know your thoughts in the comments below, and please share this post with the buttons below to help get the TRUTH out before the whole world goes NUTS on us!

David Boman, OTR/L, MBA, has over 20 years of experience in the healthcare industry as an occupational therapist, consultant, practice owner, and healthcare administrator-hospital based management and healthcare related business development. Further, he has served both oversees and locally as a volunteer healthcare provider. As a result of flu vaccine mandates for healthcare workers, which affected him directly, David has completed significant research and analysis on issues surrounding the flu vaccine, which will be covered in his soon-to-be released e-book on the subject.

Click here to scroll down through more shocking flu vaccine stories

References:

  • Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines. Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccine Minutes March 3-4 2011. Minutes from commission meeting, Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccine, 2011, 1-20.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Influenza Division. Flu View. Jan 24, 2014. http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/ (accessed Jan 27, 2014).
  • Centers for Disease Prevention and Prevention-Flu vaccine effectiveness. Flu Vaccine Effectiveness: Questions and Answers for Health Professionals. Nov 27, 2013. http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/vaccination/effectivenessqa.htm (accessed Jan 28, 2014).
  • Doshi, P. “Influenza: marketing vaccine by marketing disease.” BMJ, May 2013: 1-6.
  • Doshi, Peter. Trends in Recorded Influenza Mortality: United States, 1900–2004. May 2008. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2374803/ (accessed Jan 24, 2014).
  • Ethics-Harvard. JLME Issue on Institutional Corruption and the Pharmaceutical Industry. Sept 30, 2013. http://www.ethics.harvard.edu/lab/featured/347-jlmeissue (accessed Feb 19, 2014).
  • Texas Department of State Health Services. 2012-2013 DSHS Flu Report Week 39 . Oct 4, 2013. http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/idcu/disease/influenza/surveillance/2013/week39/ (accessed Jan 24, 2014).

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cell phones and laptopsGood morning readers! If you read the comments from my post the other day, Has Technology Stolen Your Evenings, Weekends, and Vacations?, you know that I was inspired to renew my commitment NOT to work on Sundays, and to back away from the technology.  I really need that break — I guess God knew what He was doing when he said we should rest one day a week!  So I may schedule blog posts or social media posts ahead, but on Sunday my laptop will be closed. Hopefully you’ll find me chilling out somehow, maybe outside with the kids since the weather is finally coming around, possibly reading a book, or even cooking up a new recipe. I’m really excited about this.

***Anyone else want to join me for what I’m calling, “Save Your Sanity Sundays”?

Even though many of us are real foodies and we know how powerful nourishing food is, if we walk around totally stressed, that could undo all of the good we do in our diet.

If you’re ready to STOP the madness for one day a week, and want to jump into this challenge with me, comment below so we know who is “in”. :)

Wellllll, it’s Saturday, 11:29 p.m. right now, and I’ve just started this post because we were gone all day, so it may be short, we’ll see how it goes…

  • Don’t miss the FREEBIES: I know it may seem like a lot is coming at you lately, but youza, you can’t beat FREE, right? Each of these are just a little different as far as how and when they run, but they’re a LOT different in what they’ll be teaching:
  • Some GOOD news…  We went to visit our nephew Shane and niece Hailee (his daughter) on Saturday and they’re doing great! I wanted to CHEER when Shane walked over with his walker to show us what he could do.  It’s been just over 4 months since the accident, and they both have more surgery and challenges ahead, but we’re so happy with how they’re doing. (Thank you for your prayers everyone – the number of comments at this post from all of you who have been praying still brings tears to my eyes!) :)

Shane & H collage

  • I also had to show you this cute shot I got when we were there of Hailee’s precious little pink cowgirl boots next to her Grandma’s:

cowgirl-boots

  • One picture to learn from:

Monsanto-sign

  • And one picture to laugh at:

caterpillar

nkbook

  • That’s all for this week, have a good one everybody, and remember, I’ll see you here later this week for Real Food Wednesday! (Did you know that participating is a great way to get more traffic to your blog OR to learn more about Real Food and get some great new recipes, too?!)

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Lemon Berry Coffee Cake

You can make this cake with any type of fruit filling you’d like, originally it calls for cherry pie filling, but the kind at the store has high fructose corn syrup and other nasties, so try making your own homemade pie filling instead!

IMG_2063Ingredients:  (Mostly organic ingredients, and I threw it all into my Bosch)

  • 1 c. soft pastured butter
  • 1 c. natural sugar (original recipe called for 1 1/2 c.)
  • 4 eggs beaten
  • 2 c. flour (I use part unbleached white or Einkorn flour, and part whole wheat pastry flour ground from organic soft wheat – adjust the ratios to your taste)
  • 1 t. organic vanilla IMG_2062
  • 2 t. baking powder (the kind without aluminum)
  • 1/2 t. sea salt
  • 1 t. lemon extract (another recipe called for almond extract)
  • About 2 c. fruit pie filling

IMG_2076

Instructions:

Mix all but the pie filling well, and spread into a buttered 9×13 pan. Dollop the pie filling around the batter.

Bake 350* for 35-45 minutes or until golden. The original recipe said to sprinkle powdered sugar on top, but I made real whipped cream for the top instead.  :)

^

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cell phones and laptops

It took about 200 years for unions to get us a 40 hour workweek, and it took smart phones about 5 years to completely take them away.”

If you’re reading this hoping for some answers, you may find a few here, but mostly you’ll find someone who is probably just like you. Someone struggling with the issue of how to keep technology under control in our lives, and in our children’s lives, and maybe we can get a good discussion going that will help us learn from each other…

By the way, the title of this post isn’t exactly right. “Stolen” implies that something was taken against our will, but we have clearly allowed this to happen. Certainly not on purpose, though.

Technology is an insidious, time and money-sucking beast, isn’t it?

kimmitimemoneyIn My Life:

First — MONEY:

I’ve had my Mac for a few years now, and it has made life much easier in some ways (I have to swear at it MUCH less than I did with a PC), but now that the wheel of death spins at me a good portion of the day and I frequently have to reboot, it’s time to drop big bucks on another one.  It’s not in the budget now though, so I sit.  And I wait.  Then there’s the iPhone.  Next month my contract is up and I’ve found a much cheaper way to go, but I have to buy the new phone outright.  Ouch, that’ll hurt.  It’s always some piece of technology breaking or wearing out, just like everything else around the house, especially with kids!  Yes, they’re only things, but it’s annoying. (Any tips or suggestions?)

Next — TIME:

Working at home is tough.  The computer is always here waiting, calling out for me to get on there and get caught up.  But getting “caught up” rarely happens, does it?  And with our smart phones, we can work anywhere, even on vacation, no matter what our job.  Kent is really good about just turning his off on nights and weekends. (Unless he’s got a night-job going, then he’ll need it on in case his guys on the site need him.)  I do enjoy my business (it’s fun firing you up about real food!), so that’s one thing, but I sooooo envy those, like Kent, with healthy boundaries who just shut it all down on evenings and weekends.

Maybe it’s because most of them aren’t also homeschooling…?

Yes, I need to cut myself a break sometimes.

I’d love to know YOUR ideas for setting up better boundaries and sticking to them.

Here are a few random tips that have helped me recently:

Some of these are related to getting more done, but mostly it’s about feeling better, so I can accept and be at peace about what I can’t get done each day…

  • I’ve been thinking a lot about a post Jen Fulwiler put up on this topic recently: The Secret to Not Being Overwhelmed. I can’t say that this has completely taken away my frequent feelings of being overwhelmed, but it has helped a little to remind myself, “Maybe I wasn’t supposed to get that done today…”
  • Do you know what else has helped me a lot? Making sure I keep up on taking my ‘all-natural chill pill’ for anxiety. (Click here to read that post or just click here to order it.) Seriously, when I’m consistent with this, I’m more level in every way. The kids’ fighting and teasing doesn’t drive me to insanity (not as much anyway!), the never-ending to-do list “can just wait”, and my moods are much more pleasant.
  • Earthing matI use this Earthing Mat to mitigate the effects of using technology so much in my life.  (Read that post here or click here to order.)
  • Now that we’re homeschooling, and I’ve learned the value of the “NO” word, I don’t feel as pulled into outside commitments, so that helps a lot. I don’t feel guilty about it anymore, either; I’ll be able to jump back into church ministries, cooking more meals for people, or other volunteer positions that I know I’d be good at when the kids are grown. God certainly doesn’t call me to run myself ragged, so for now I’m a homeschooling Mom and I have my business and that’s IT.
  • It helps to keep reminding myself that even during that one year when all of the kids were in school (the year before we began homeschooling), I couldn’t get it “all done” then, either, so it’s never going to be “all done”.
  • I’ve been trying to get better about not working on the computer on Sundays, so I can hang with the kids, cook something extra delicious, and enjoy my favorite pastime: reading. If I could just be better about that, then working evenings and Saturdays probably wouldn’t bother me so much.  I can’t always pull it off, though, especially if we’re gone all day on the Saturday prior.
  • boundariesI always feel better when I make a point to get outside to walk/run or to get to Zumba. Even reading on the treadmill is a treat!  What’s YOUR favorite way to get moving?
  • I’ve been better about going to bed with Kent between 9:00 and 10:00 — for real! Then I get up early and work when I’m fresh and the kids are still sleeping.  It’s so nice and quiet, and I’ve got my coffee…   :)
  • Somehow (and I don’t know exactly how) the answer is in not allowing the time-suck to continue. Maybe I need to re-read my book called, Boundaries, When to Say Yes, When to Say No, How to Take Control of Your life!

In Our Kids’ Lives:

FB-pongWorse than all of the affects on my own life, are the ramifications I see in our kids’ lives. Our oldest has his cell phone on him at all times, and of course he won’t listen to his Mom and get this radiation reducing case like I have (I even said I’d pay for it!). Our almost 15 year old gets all stressed out when someone has raided their Minecraft site (although I do love the mostly NON-violent play on that game). Our 12-year-old daughter loves to watch cooking shows on the iPad.  Our 8 year old enjoys playing FIFA on PS4 with his big brother. Yes, there’s the option to “go Amish” and rip it all out of here. But, besides that it would be a bit hypocritical when I spend so much time myself on electronics for my business, I also don’t see how we could go back now.  It’s what our teen DOES with his friends. It’s also something good for us to take away when they’re grounded. We’re pretty good about boundaries with the younger two, and thankfully they do love doing/playing other kid things, being outside, etc., but in the next breath we complain that they don’t like to read as much as we do. I just don’t have the answers.

Watch this video with more about the technology rat race:

“They call it the great American speed up.  So many of us today seem to be in overdrive.”

“If you’re old enough you remember a day when after work you go home from work and maybe once every six months you would get an after-hours call from work, but for the most part you didn’t think about work until it was time to go back to work the next day. Well, not anymore. Now work is in your hand, on the screen, staring you in the face…”

attribution for original photo above

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NEW HERE?

Welcome and PLEASE read below before you link up as this is a REAL FOOD carnival, and very different from others you may have joined in on.

I LISTENED TO YOU!

A reader friend suggested in my little survey recently that I add a Mr. Linky thumbnail pictures option, so that is now enabled, and you have another good way to draw us in so we’ll click on your recipe. :)

I LOVE WEDNESDAYS!

It’s that crazy time of the week when you entice us with your links and comments to go check out your blogs and your great REAL FOOD WEDNESDAY tips and ideas or recipes!  (Visit that link if you’re new and want to learn more about this blog carnival.)  Remember, if you’re a blogger, you’ll draw some good traffic to your site by participating!  (This is how I built up my traffic in the beginning, and don’t miss my tips below.)

CAN YOU HELP?  (6 rules and tips!)  (Note:  here’s where those of you who are new will want to read carefully, thank you!)

1.  It’s not easy for me to catch them all on my own, and I’d really like everyone to play fair, so if you see any posts that don’t link back to this post (blog carnival etiquette you know!), can you email me please?  Kelly@KellytheKitchenKop.com.  If you don’t know how, I explain it at this REAL FOOD WEDNESDAY link.  (I hate playing hardball and removing links, so let’s all be good to the others who are bringing more traffic to your blogs with their links by doing the same, OK?)

2.  Also, PLEASE let me know if you see a recipe posted that is blatantly not Real Food.  Someone who is striving and on the journey is one thing (as we all are), but if it’s really bad (with things like canned bread, meat substitutes, Velveeta, margarine/vegetable oil/canola oil, Egg Beaters, unfermented soy/tofu or any other fake food), please tell me so I can remove it.  (If I’ve removed your post, I hope there are no hard feelings, but people come to this post for Real Food ideas, and I don’t want to disappoint.)

3.  I hope you’ll retweet, share on Facebook, and stumble this post and also any sites you visit – this will get more exposure to all of us, thank you!  (You can do this easily and quickly with the share links above and below the post.)

4.  Please don’t link up to your post where you’re writing about something as an affiliate if I’m already an affiliate for the same thing, OK?  That includes giveaway posts.  (Thank you for understanding!)

5.  Want more traffic at your blog?  if you’re linking up and hoping for more traffic to your blog, can I make a suggestion for how to boost your traffic?  Besides just adding your link to the Mr. Linky doohicky, if you also comment and include just ONE interesting sentence to grab the readers attention AND a link to that specific post, you’ll get more hits for sure.  But don’t put more than one link in there, or it will get hung up in my moderation area, and you never know how long it will be ’til I get around to approving those.

6.  Don’t have a blog? We still want to hear from you!  Please leave your tips or recipes in the comments.

Thank you!

You’re up, and we can’t wait to see your stuff!



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Strawberry Creme Crepes

Strawberry Lemon Cream Crepes

These strawberry lemon cream crepes are full of light summery flavors you’ll love, even if summer is still a few months off, and especially if winter where you are has been as long and hard as ours has been here in Michigan.

stainless steel electric panIf you have one of my favorite pans it’ll make frying the crepes go much faster because you can get a lot more going at once.  Click here to check out my favorite pan.

I pulled a few different recipes together to come up with this one, let me know if you like it.  Don’t forget to look over the extra pictures below the recipe.  :)

This makes about 40 crepes and serves about 20.  I made a lot since we were having friends over.  Obviously, cut these amounts if you’re serving fewer people.

Lemon crepe ingredients:

  • 3 cups milk
  • 6 eggs, pastured eggs are best
  • 5 Tablespoons pastured butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon lemon extract
  • 5 Tablespoons natural sugar (whichever you like best, I like palm sugar)
  • 2 1/2 cups unbleached flour, I like Einkorn flour best

Here are a few grain-free crepe options:

Cream cheese filling ingredients:

  • 2 cups cream (“whipping cream”) or cream off the top of your raw milk  (Read more about fresh, raw milk here.)
  • 16 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 3 cups organic powdered sugar

Strawberry sauce ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup natural sugar
  • 4 Tablespoons arrowroot flour
  • Juice from 1 lemon (or 1 teaspoon lemon extract)
  • About 2 1/2 pounds frozen strawberries, thawed (or about 8 cups fresh)

Fresh sliced strawberries for the top

Instructions:

In a food processor, puree the strawberry sauce ingredients until smooth; spoon into a bowl and set aside, or put into the fridge if you’re not serving until later.  In a mixing bowl (I use my Bosch to make it fast and hands-free, but you could also use a stick blender), mix together the cream cheese filling ingredients; spoon into a bowl and set aside — again, put it in the fridge if you’re not serving until later.  In another mixing bowl (or rinse out and dry the Bosch bowl), mix together all of the crepe ingredients except the flour, and once that’s mixed together well, then add the flour and mix.  It will be a thin batter.

3 Tablespoons of batter makes just the right size, or you could also use a ladle.  Pour the batter onto a buttered frying pan — again, using my favorite pan makes it go faster, and I kept the temperature at about 250*.  I probably should’ve used a bit higher temp so they’d get a little golden on the outsides, but I tend to forget things and burn food a lot (I’m right on the ball like that), so I kept it lower for once to prevent that from happening.  (I’d like to think that someday I’ll learn.)  You’ll be able to tell when they change color a little and are done on both sides.  Cool on a plate between pieces of parchment paper.

When you’re ready to serve, assemble like this:  Fill each crepe with 2-3 Tablespoons of cream cheese filling and roll up, using a bit of the filling to keep the top piece of crepe sticking down onto the bottom piece.  Spoon strawberry sauce over the top, and garnish with extra fresh berries.

Let me know what you think!

Here are a few more pictures:

crepes fillingcrepes-fillingcrepescrepes on pan

crepes-strawberries

Strawberry Creme Crepes

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Good morning readers.  Please say a little prayer for me because I’m in the process of switching my website hosting company and it’s been a BIG pain in the rear.  Right now I’m working on our old PC because I can’t even GET onto my site on my Mac right now.  I stink at all of this stuff and can only muddle through with His help.  And my all natural chill-pill helps a lot, too, it really does.  :)  Thank you!

On a happier note, our 12 year old friend, Spencer, and his basketball team won the gold in the Special Olympics over the weekend!!  Here’s a picture of him with his family, the only one missing is Kyle, he’s still recovering from his severe injury in Afghanistan – Click here to read more about Kyle, Spencer and their amazing family.

photo

  • nkbookGuess what?  Jenny’s book now has the “look inside” feature, check it out here.

Sign up here and you’ll be inspired to…

  • Enjoy being a mother by learning how to stop comparing, judging, or feeling guilty.
  • Put dinner on the table with a few simple tricks when you create 30 days worth of meals in just a few hours.  (We all need more of these ideas up our sleeve.)
  • Get your kids to listen without yelling, nagging, or reminding. (THIS is the one I am MOST excited about!)
  • Organize any space and keep it that way. (With kids?  Yeah, right, I gotta hear that one…)
  • Maintain (or re-light) the spark in your relationship (I know many of you are hurting in this area.)
  • Reclaim your rockin’ bod’ after childbirth without DIEting.  (Real food is powerful.)
  • Take simple steps to define your time and balance being a mom with other projects/work.  (“Balance” – what in the world is THAT?)

And much more – you can even listen and learn while doing the dishes or hanging out in your sweats. :)

Click here to sign up.The-Best-Sourdough-Bread-Recipe

  • This picture on Facebook cracked me up last week.  One of the commenters there said, “I wonder how they smell?”  Haaaaaa.   There’s another hilarious one that has been seen by almost 5 million peeps now, click here to check that one out.

crackers

  • pigHave you seen this book?  Written by a British chef, A Girl and Her Pig is a down-to-earth, entertaining cookbook full of exquisite recipes (for more than pork) and pictures.  There are tons of glowing reviews, except by those who were offended by the great cover!  Click here to download the $2.99 Kindle version.
  • Check out this soooooo neat pregnancy time-lapse video, and through it all the guy is singing a song to his wife.  :)

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Sunday dinner

Growing up I always loved relaxing on Sundays and smelling the comforting aromas of whatever yummy homemade meal my Mom was making for Sunday dinner.  (She’s a great cook and taught me so much.  Now I’m learning from Kent’s Mom, too, who is also a great homemade cook.)  Isn’t there just something about the smell of a roasting chicken or a pot roast that makes you feel content?

Today I’ve embedded a few of my favorite Sunday dinner recipes into this handy dandy widget:

Here are the links in case you can’t get the widget to work:

I thought it would be fun to gather a collection of these Sunday dinner recipes all in one spot, so I agreed to write this paid post for Foodie.com, I hope you like it!

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ipad-thyroid-image

Ready to heal your thyroid?!

If you’ve struggled with thyroid problems, but haven’t been able to get well again, and you’re frustrated with the mainstream advice, you’ll want to watch/listen to these free talks starting up soon.

There will be naturopaths, nutritionists, and other health experts explaining how you can regain your energy, lose excess body fat, and heal your thyroid NATURALLY through real food, lifestyle changes, and getting the lab testing you need.  (Click here to register, it’s free.)

The frustration and misinformation surrounding thyroid problems is rampant, and an estimated 30 million people in the US and 200 million worldwide have a thyroid disorder — only half have been properly diagnosed.  Even less are receiving the right treatment.  Sadly, most docs don’t know how to fix this and insurance rarely covers what does fix it, so the only solution is learning how to heal yourself.

Hormone CureYou’ll hear from experts like…

CLICK HERE to register for the FREE Thyroid Sessions.

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Latest_BottlesIf you didn’t see the original post, which explains the fraud and corruption in the olive oil industry, and why you MUST know your olive oil source to protect yourself against the cheap heart-killer oils that are added to the “extra virgin olive oil” at the grocery store, you can find that here:

extra-virginityThe Olive Oil Mafia — Be Aware of the Extensive Lies and Corruption {Yes, There is a Solution}

Or you can buy it here:

Click here for the Olea Estates organic extra virgin olive oil that we use (and learn about a discount there, too).

You’ll also want to read this book:

Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil

Olea Estates Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil Testimonies:

The following testimonies are from the comments at last week’s post – I was blown away by how many have tried it already, but not surprised at how much everyone loves it!

  • I have been using this olive oil for years and Kelly is right! The best part about this stuff is the taste but I love knowing what I am eating. We hear all the time how great olive oil is for you but there are no benefits if you’re not eating the real stuff. I have also had great experience using this on my face using the oil cleansing method. It’s helped a ton with my minor acne. I promise you this stuff is worth every penny. In our house it’s bought by the gallon.
  • I love Olea’s olive oil. I live near St. Louis, so I’ve picked it up at local markets a time or two and bought a case at the mini WAPF conference when it was here a few years ago.
  • As a biochemist who has spent extensive times in food and pharmaceutical industries for testing flavor compounds particular flavor compounds as well as seeking biomarkers and chemicals for diagnosing cardiovascular disease. I believe that the best chefs said it that all Good FOOD comes from nutritious grown ingredients with equally important sauce and cook at the right time and temperature – Science and Cook (http://www.seas.harvard.edu/cooking)!  I have been consuming Olea Estate Olive oil since 2010 when I met Karl who was presenting to our community garden evening meeting with organic seeds and this delicious olive oil. I was hooked immediately, and have been using THE ONLY OIL since. The oil can be used for all cooking needs without any other oil. I have used to complete my Harvard Science and Cooking Final Project for delicious flourless pancakes! It is absolutely NOT necessary to have any other oil although you may be told otherwise by a recipe cook book.  How do you tell that it is a good quality olive oil, you can simply swirl the oil on the wall of the bottle and see how long it takes to run down-viscosity == thickness == density of the oil; you can also see how fast the oil spreads in your sauté pan? == the slower the spread, the thicker the oil; you can also see how much residue oil is in your pan after you empty the pan, just like wine tasting – color, swirl, smell, taste, and savor! Please read the original stories from NPR here: Tom Mueller “Losing ‘Virginity’: Olive Oil’s ‘Scandalous’ Fraud” at http://www.npr.org/2011/12/12/143154180/losing-virginity-olive-oils-scandalous-industry and “To Get The Benefits Of Olive Oil, Fresh May Be Best” http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/09/30/226844915/to-get-the-benefits-of-olive-oil-fresh-may-be-best. Bon appétit! Lin Lewis (PhD & MBA)
  • I’ve been using Olea for years and don’t buy anything else. It’s fabulous on salad (my favorite is mixed with a little lemon juice and sea salt), and I often sauté with it, mixed with grass fed ghee, and also finish dishes with it at the end of cooking. Gives great flavor. The best part, though, is knowing where it comes from and that it is a good, healthy, delicious, traditional fat I feel good about eating and feeding my family.
  • Karl introduced me to this wonderful oil a few years ago, and without a doubt, its the _best_ I’ve ever had! Now, it’s hard to even consider using anything else. I give away several bottles at Christmas time to family and friends and they love it too. Great stuff, indeed.
  • Like many have already said, it’s the taste that keeps me using Olea, but knowing where it comes from and the purity of the oil it the icing on the cake! Olea, good bread and a nice bottle of wine is culinary heaven!!
  • Olea is hands down the best olive oil I have ever had. After speaking with Karl Burgart about all olive oil and where it comes from I don’t think I will be able to use any big brand again. It means so much to me to know that this oil is all coming from one family farm. Thanks for opening my eyes to the world of real olive oil.
  • My husband and I have been using Olea olive oil for years now and we wouldn’t buy anything else! The flavor and depth it adds to our cooking is absolutely awesome and other grocery store olive oils don’t even compare. As professionals in the dance industry we are very aware of the foods that we use to nourish and power our bodies and Olea is not just the best tasting olive oil but a genuine health food. And of course Karl and his entire crew are the nicest and most knowledgeable team when it comes to not just their product but sourcing the BEST most flavorful food around. Cheers!

olivesClick here for the Olea Estates organic extra virgin olive oil that we use (and learn about a discount there, too).

Have you seen my roasted veggie recipes using Olea olive oil?

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fibromyalgia-cure-Liz

If you are suffering with fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or another auto-immune disease, keep reading for some HOPE!

Remember, if YOU have a real food success and healing story to share, please email me!  Kelly@KellytheKitchenKop.com.  (Read all of the real food success stories here.)

Today Liz, a reader friend who I became familiar with when she commented on another post, shares her journey of healing herself from Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome:

I was diagnosed with FMS at the tender age of 25.  I had the classic burning pain between the shoulder blades, along the tops of my thighs, accompanied by extreme fatigue and terrible brain fog.  Sleep was becoming more and more evasive.  I religiously exercised, lifting weights and taking and teaching fitness classes — I was a cardio queen.  I was the “healthiest” eater I knew, eating only “lean” low-fat foods.  Think bagels, low-fat ice-cream, salads, muscle meats with absolutely no fat on them, and “I can’t believe it’s not butter” spray.  LOL, I was determined to beat this thing.  Doctors gave me a grim prognosis with no other cure than prescriptions for sleep aids.  Somehow I knew I would get through it if I just prayed for answers and pushed forward when they arrived.

I moved to Arizona to get out of the cold and rainy Seattle weather.  I opened up a small fitness studio so I could do body work all day long to keep my body from getting as stiff as it did at a desk job.  Amazingly, the landlord of the studio became a client, and to my surprise she pointed out that I had FMS.  Darn, I thought I was hiding it pretty good….  Brenda became my best friend and mentor, as she too had FMS.  We tried many things, guaifenesin was the main thing.  As our health was notably improving, she started a local support group, and then a website:  Fibromyalgiarecovery.com.   Eventually she became more focused on nutrient deficiencies that cause the same symptoms of FMS and we embarked on the iodine protocol and the Weston A. Price Foundation.  We dropped the guai protocol and lo-and-behold, focusing on iodine and probiotics my body began to recover more completely.  It took me 3 years of researching to finally accept the new knowledge that butter and other saturated fats should be consumed.  Being so deeply brainwashed that saturated fat was bad, it was a very hard nugget of information to swallow.

It’s been a 13-year journey, but my dear friend and I are fibro free and have been for many years now.  She, in her late 60′s, has just returned from serving 3 consecutive missions in Taiwan and Hong Kong!  I attribute it to replenishing iodine (With the protocol!  Do not just start taking iodine without the protocol!!!  Especially selenium…), healing our guts the hard way (the GAPS diet would have been nice to have indeed – find a super helpful GAPS starter package here) and becoming aware of thought patterns and adjusting them to replace toxic thoughts with nurturing ones.  I believe FMS starts and ends in the gut (my mother has an ileostomy due to severe Crohn’s) and can manifest as problems in the adrenal/thyroid/pituitary axis, or any other auto-immune disease.  Clearly it can be completely reversed.  I thank God every day for the answers He is revealing to those of us who simply ask with an open heart.

Oh, and by the way, I gratefully feed my family butter (very liberally), eggs, raw cheese, homemade yogurt and kefir, whole fat raw goat’s milk, grass fed/finished beef, truly pastured soy-free…corn-free…hormone-free…GMO free chicken.  I no longer eat just the muscle meat- we now enjoy all sorts of organ meats — talk about a boost in my sense of well being!  Okay okay, I don’t love cow liver yet (chicken liver is good though) and at times I blend/dehydrate/and make pills with it and take it with a heap of sauerkraut to better absorb the B’s.  I soak or sprout all of my family’s grains beans nuts and seeds, make bone broth so we never run out, take magnesium, use magnesium oil on my skin, take fermented cod liver oil, etc.  In my 20′s I felt like a wreck, now I’m nearing 40 with a 6 year old and 3 year old, never before have I felt so vibrantly healthy.  I still love the gym,  but now I prefer high intensity intervals over long drawn out cardio sessions.  I will never stop strength training.  At 5’5″ I easily maintain a weight of 130.  I would have never dreamed that I would be able to do all that I am doing now.  In fact, we are building a home on an acre, about to start a little homestead with goats and chickens!  I haven’t had any fibromyalgia symptoms since about 2006 – I think it’s safe to say now, that I am cured.

A gift indeed.  I can not imagine where I’d be right now if I had continued on the path of conventional wisdom.  My life was centered on sleep and I never felt like I could get enough no matter how long I slept.  Now I am busy all day and rarely feel the desire to nap.  It feels like getting a total do-over on life.

Powerful huh?  I asked Liz what she thought of my recent post:  Can Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome be Cured?  A Not so Sparkly Book Review…

fibro-first-yearRegarding your “not so sparkly book review” post, I strongly agree with your comments.  Cholesterol and saturated fats are part of what I feel helped me recover.  I have come to believe that FMS is an issue with the pituitary/thyroid/adrenal axis.  It seems as though it can be triggered by traumatic events, or anything that damages the gut, which traumatic events can do, now that I think about it.  From what I’ve studied, adrenals thrive on a higher fat diet as well, since surprisingly they are more involved with regulating blood sugar than the pancreas!  I should also mention that I have not read the book you reviewed, I’m just responding to what I read in your post.  I was also shocked that the book did not mention gut health.  I’ll explain why.  When I was helping Brenda with her FMS recovery support group, the author of “Fibromyalgia: The First Year“, Claudia Merek, trained me to become a “mapper”.   I felt people’s bodies for lumps and bumps, which was part of a guaifenesin protocol we were doing.

We eventually parted ways because Brenda and I felt that iodine was somehow doing what the guaifenesin protocol had done for us, without having to go through the agony of avoiding salicylates…long story.  We tried to share our research with her, but we never heard from her since.

I promise, I’m getting to the gut explanation here…During the years that I mapped people,  I would relentlessly interrogate them about what they were doing before the instances that their maps got worse.  According to R. Paul St. Amand M.D., the doctor who created the guaifenisin protocol, if someone’s map got worse during the protocol, it was the patient’s fault for accidentally exposing themselves to salicylates. But I went to people’s homes and painstakenly scrutinized every item for every ingredient on the label of anything that would be consumed or applied to skin, such as makeup etc.  We would spend weeks together trying to figure out what the culprit was that was exposing them to this, because it supposedly would block the effects of the guai.  It quickly became clear to me that there was much more to the story.

Every time someone’s map got worse and we couldn’t find a salicylate lurking in their possession to blame, they had either been exposed to a round of antibiotics, consumed more sugar than usual, used a hormonal contraceptive, or had a recent stressful event.  I have never read anything that has confirmed my thoughts, but I suspect it was inflammation that I was feeling from an overgrown yeast/fungus such as candida, and I think food sensitivities contributed as well.  If only we had known about the GAPS protocol!  Sheesh, it’s all so clear now.

I also would be willing to bet that people with FMS are low in A, D, K, and magnesium, along with many others.  Dr. St. Amand hypothesized that calcium phosphates were to blame, and that they were building up in all sorts of places in the body.  The guai was supposed to clear it out.  Maybe it does, he didn’t even know for sure, but it seems pretty clear to me that calcium going where it’s not supposed to is a fat soluble vitamin deficiency problem.  We should have been told to take FCLO with grass fed butter and consume plenty of organ meats!  Also, amazingly, when you see the list of FMS symptoms next to a list of magnesium deficiency symptoms, all but a few overlap!

I probably told you more than you ever wanted to know, but hopefully it’s at least merely interesting.  :)

Thanks for sharing your story and your wisdom, Liz!  Check out her brand new blog called, ArtisanPartisan.com:  “It’s going to be all about making everything from scratch as part of my healing journey.  So far I’ve only managed one real post though.”  :)

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NEW HERE?

Welcome and PLEASE read below before you link up as this is a REAL FOOD carnival, and very different from others you may have joined in on.

I LISTENED TO YOU!

A reader friend suggested in my little survey recently that I add a Mr. Linky thumbnail pictures option, so that is now enabled, and you have another good way to draw us in so we’ll click on your recipe. :)

I LOVE WEDNESDAYS!

It’s that crazy time of the week when you entice us with your links and comments to go check out your blogs and your great REAL FOOD WEDNESDAY tips and ideas or recipes!  (Visit that link if you’re new and want to learn more about this blog carnival.)  Remember, if you’re a blogger, you’ll draw some good traffic to your site by participating!  (This is how I built up my traffic in the beginning, and don’t miss my tips below.)

CAN YOU HELP?  (6 rules and tips!)  (Note:  here’s where those of you who are new will want to read carefully, thank you!)

1.  It’s not easy for me to catch them all on my own, and I’d really like everyone to play fair, so if you see any posts that don’t link back to this post (blog carnival etiquette you know!), can you email me please?  Kelly@KellytheKitchenKop.com.  If you don’t know how, I explain it at this REAL FOOD WEDNESDAY link.  (I hate playing hardball and removing links, so let’s all be good to the others who are bringing more traffic to your blogs with their links by doing the same, OK?)

2.  Also, PLEASE let me know if you see a recipe posted that is blatantly not Real Food.  Someone who is striving and on the journey is one thing (as we all are), but if it’s really bad (with things like canned bread, meat substitutes, Velveeta, margarine/vegetable oil/canola oil, Egg Beaters, unfermented soy/tofu or any other fake food), please tell me so I can remove it.  (If I’ve removed your post, I hope there are no hard feelings, but people come to this post for Real Food ideas, and I don’t want to disappoint.)

3.  I hope you’ll retweet, share on Facebook, and stumble this post and also any sites you visit – this will get more exposure to all of us, thank you!  (You can do this easily and quickly with the share links above and below the post.)

4.  Please don’t link up to your post where you’re writing about something as an affiliate if I’m already an affiliate for the same thing, OK?  That includes giveaway posts.  (Thank you for understanding!)

5.  Want more traffic at your blog?  if you’re linking up and hoping for more traffic to your blog, can I make a suggestion for how to boost your traffic?  Besides just adding your link to the Mr. Linky doohicky, if you also comment and include just ONE interesting sentence to grab the readers attention AND a link to that specific post, you’ll get more hits for sure.  But don’t put more than one link in there, or it will get hung up in my moderation area, and you never know how long it will be ’til I get around to approving those.

6.  Don’t have a blog? We still want to hear from you!  Please leave your tips or recipes in the comments.

Thank you!

You’re up, and we can’t wait to see your stuff!



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Natural

This video is hilarious, but before you watch it, I do want you to be aware that there are some good companies out there who are really trying to provide quality products in a price range that people can afford.  These companies will sometimes use the same “natural” word as the others who only care about the bottom line.

Read this Facebook conversation with one of my sponsors about this very issue.

I know and trust the owners of that company, but since it’s not easy to become familiar with the people behind every single product you buy, it stinks that we can just trust our food labels!

Now enjoy the video, and let it just make you more aware.  This guy is a cheeseball, but a funny one.  :)

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French FriesHappy St. Patrick’s Day!  

We celebrated yesterday by having friends over for Reuben sandwiches with corned beef from the farm, cole slaw (my own dressing of course), and homemade French fries!

Here’s what I found for you today…

  • Prepare to SCRATCH!  This is a short video of when our daughter had lice, so you can see what they look like.  I didn’t think we’d survive the ordeal, but we did, and without the dangerous chemicals! Click here to read how we got rid of lice naturally.  And watch the icky video here:

  • Last week was the one-year anniversary of Pope Francis’ papacy, and even if you’re not Catholic, you’ve got to love this video of the Dominican Sisters at the Ann Arbor, Michigan house who were in the middle of recording their first album when they heard the news that there was white smoke…  Their reaction is really fun to watch.  (Thanks Conversion Diary/Jennifer Fulwiler for sharing it!  Don’t forget to pre-order Jen’s book, which is finally coming out soon!)

  • grainfreeclassSALES SALES SALES!  Here are a few classes/books from my blogging friends on sale this month:
  • SimplySaladsBySeason.530Almost farmers market time again!!!  Want to know how to take advantage of all the in-season, local, beautiful fruits and vegetables available from your local farmers?  Tired of picking up bottles of salad dressing with ingredients labels that read like chemistry texts?  Saddened by how even so-called organic dressings still contain unhealthy refined oils like canola and soy?  Click here to get Simply Salads e-book from Kristen at Food Renegade – 35% off with code SPRINGFUN.
  • Tired of dealing with exhaustion, stress, poor digestion, cold feet and mood swings?  Do you want to finally wake up rested instead of exhausted?  Ready to end the cycle of restrictive diets?  Do you want to find out how to exercise the smart way that boosts your metabolic health?  The-Nourished-Metabolism-Hardcover-SingleClick here to get The Nourished Metabolism – 50% off with code MARCH50.
  • OK, this one is kind of dumb, but yet fun!  Mine was “green stack of books” – Share yours in the comments (come on, it’ll be fun!) or here in the Facebook conversation:)

superhero

  • Here’s one I knew you’d love on parenting

Mommy

  • You guys are really going to think I’m nuts when you read this one…  Don’t tell anyone, okay?  Once I was on my way up North alone, to my aunt and uncle’s house in Traverse City, and there was a loooooooong stretch of road and it was very dark and late and I’d had coffee, a lot of it, because I get sleepy when I drive.  You probably know where this is going…  Well I’ve never admitted it to anyone, except my sisters who thought I was NUTS:  I went in a diaper that I found in the van — I HAD to do it, don’t judge me!  Then the other day I found out about these little doohickys, which apparently are actually pretty popular.  (I’m not so weird after all, people!)  It seems to be split between the “Go Girl” and the “Shewee“, and a few others.  And they’re not just for you gals who get yourself in a predicament like I tend to do.  Whether you’re camping this summer, or can’t find a clean public bathroom, or maybe you’re like my friend who uses them when she’s traveling overseas in places without good restroom facilities, these things could be really handy.  I’m just not sure if my brain would let me go standing up…  Anyway, hopefully I’m not grossing anyone out with all this talk on a Monday morning, lol!

  • RealFoodWednesdaysI’ll see you here later this week for Real Food Wednesday! (Did you know that participating is a great way to get more traffic to your blog OR to learn more about Real Food and get some great new recipes, too?!)

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roasted beet and walnut salad with spiced kombucha vinaigrette image p 22

Nourished KitchenThis Roasted Beet and Walnut Salad recipe is from The Nourished Kitchen: Farm-to-Table Recipes for the Traditional Foods Lifestyle Featuring Bone Broths, Fermented Vegetables, Grass-Fed Meats, Wholesome Fats, Raw Dairy, and Kombuchas, the soon-to-be-released cookbook by my friend, Jennifer McGruther – click here to pre-order it now and it’ll ship the day it’s available!

Check out my post from the other day: It’s not a cookbook, it’s a work of ART!  You’ll find links to more Nourished Kitchen recipes there, too.  :)

Here’s Jenny…

Roasted Beet and Walnut Salad with Spiced Kombucha Vinaigrette

Kombucha, a fermented tea of Asian origin, offers a flavor reminiscent of apple cider vinegar: it’s sour, but also mildly sweet. Its flavor pairs well with warm spices like cinnamon, cloves, and allspice, while its acidity is strong enough to stand up against the sweet and earthy flavors of root vegetables and nuts.

Beets number among the few vegetables that my family eats year-round, fresh in spring and autumn and stored in boxes of dirt during the cold part of the year. Lacking greens in the winter, we often eat beets as a salad, sprinkled with roasted walnuts and dressed with a spiced vinaigrette.

Roasted Beet and Walnut Salad

Serves 4 to 6

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds beets
  • 1 tablespoon clarified butter (page 59)
  • 3/4 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1 small red onion, sliced into rings no thicker than 1/8 inch

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 425°F.
To prepare the salad, trim the beets by removing any beet tops and the tips of their roots. Dot each beet with a touch of clarified butter, then wrap each in parchment paper and again in aluminum foil. Roast the beets for 45 to 60 minutes, until they yield under the pressure of a fork. Refrigerate the beets for at least 8 and up to 24 hours.

Spiced Kombucha Vinaigrette

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons unflavored kombucha (page 286)
  • 1/4 teaspoon finely ground unrefined sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 tablespoons cold-pressed walnut oil
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Instructions:

To prepare the vinaigrette, whisk the kombucha tea with the salt, allspice, cloves, and the walnut and olive oils. The vinaigrette will store at room temperature for up to 3 weeks, but remember to shake it vigorously before dressing the salad because the oil will separate from the tea and spices when left sitting.

Putting it Together:

Just before serving, heat a skillet over medium-high heat for 2 to 3 minutes until very hot. Toss in the walnuts and toast them for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring frequently to avoid scorching.

Remove the cold beets from the fridge, peel them, and chop into bite-sized pieces. In a large bowl, toss the beets with the sliced onion and toasted walnuts. Drizzle with the vinaigrette, toss again, and serve.

Click here to pre-order Jenny’s Nourished Kitchen cookbook!

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