Comparing a Low Fat Menu to a Weston A. Price Menu

November 6, 2008 · 24 comments

Today I wanted to share with you an interesting comparison of a Nourishing Traditions/Weston A. Price menu (which will be served to the lucky dogs at the WAP conference in San Francisco this weekend), vs. a low fat menu served at another conference.

(FIRST: if you’re looking for the info on FERMENTED VEGGIES, look down in the comments…  Also see this post on getting more fermented foods into your kids for a good overview and great links.)

The below email came from my new friend, Karen from California, a reader I’ve “met” since beginning my blog. Thanks for letting me post it, Karen. :)

I’ll begin with an email she sent to Sally Fallon:

nourishing traditionsSally,

I thought you should know…I look at this menu for the next low fat seminar and actually get hungry. But it’s a hunger I know will not be satiated.

I found the menus on the Weston A. Price site for the upcoming conference and it brings back memories of my first meals, Nourishing Traditions way, in Vancouver. I remember eating HALF my dinner and being puuurfectly happy and satisfied… and totally baffled and surprised.

Recovering people need specifics. You can promise your audience that they will FEEL better, not necessarily tomorrow, but within a month, if they try the Nourishing Traditions way….

Thank you for working so hard. I literally feel as though you have saved my life.

Karen

MC DOUGALL PROGRAM MEALS


WEDNESDAY 6:30PM DINNER BUFFET
MIXED GREEN SALAD WITH OIL FREE DRESSINGS
BOWLS OF ASSORTED VEGETABLES & BEANS
TWO STEAMED VEGETABLES
DIJON SPINACH SALAD
VEGETABLE BARLEY SALAD
PEA SOUP
BAKED YAMS, PEANUT DRESSING
Serve dressing on side
POLENTA WITH BLACK BEANS AND MANGO SALSA
CONFETTI RICE
SHEPHERD’S VEGETABLE PIE
FRUIT COBBLER
HERB TEA, DECAF ICED TEA
RICE MILK, ALMOND MILK


THURSDAY 7:30AM BREAKFAST BUFFET
STEEL CUT IRISH OATMEAL
RICE MILK, SOY MILK, ALMOND MILK
SLICED BANANAS, CHOPPED APPLE
ASSORTED SLICED FRUIT
CINNAMON, MACE, NUTMEG
STEVIA, BROWN SUGAR
COLD CEREALS: PUFFED CORN, PUFFED RICE, PUFFED MILLET
SHREDDED WHEAT, GRAPENUTS, UNCLE SAM CEREAL
BAKED POTATO PATTIES
SALSA, KETCHUP, BARBECUE SAUCE
HERB TEA


THURSDAY 1:00PM LUNCH BUFFET
MIXED GREEN SALAD WITH OIL FREE DRESSINGS
BOWLS OF ASSORTED VEGETABLES & BEANS
STEAMED VEGETABLES (squash, spinach, carrots) sautéed with ORIENTAL DIJON DRESSING
CHUNKY VEGETABLE SALAD
SOUTHWESTERN BLACK BEAN SOUP
ASIAN RICE SALAD
MAPLE MASHED SWEET POTATOES
WICKED MUSHROOMS
BAKED POTATOES, BROWN RICE
GLOBAL BEAN STEW
KETCHUP, BARBECUE SAUCE, SALSA
HERB TEA, DECAF ICED TEA


THURSDAY 6:30PM DINNER BUFFET
MIXED GREEN SALAD WITH OIL FREE DRESSINGS
BOWLS OF ASSORTED VEGETABLES & BEANS
SHREDDED SALAD
STEAMED VEGETABLES
MEXI SOUP
TEX-MEX POTATOES
WITH ENCHILADA SAUCE
INSTANT MEXICAN BROWN RICE
MASHED PINTO BEANS
ONIONS, DICED TOMATO, SHREDDED LETTUCE, SALSA
WHOLE WHEAT AND CORN TORTILLAS
TABASCO SAUCE
RICE PUDDING
RICE MILK, ALMOND MILK
BASKET OF ASSORTED FRESH FRUIT
HERB TEA, DECAF ICED TEA


Weston A. Price Foundation Menu November 7 – 9, 2008

 

Friday Lunch – Buffet – Hispanic

Salmon Ceviche

Green Salad

Pulled Pork Enchilada Casserole with Lime Soaked Tortillas with Cheese on the Side

Refried Black Beans w/ Lard

Sour Cream on Side

Fermented Cortido

Coconut Dried Fruit Bars

Tropical Fruit Salad

***************

Friday Dinner – Buffet – Home Cookin’

Waldorf Type Salad

Roasted Turkey with Giblet Gravy

Sliced Sweet Potatoes

Mashed Potatoes

Green Vegetable

Fermented Sauerkraut

Warm Cranberry/Apple Crumble

*******************

Saturday Lunch – Buffet – Farmhouse Lunch

Beet Salad, Green Salad

Sourdough Bread and Butter

Turkey Soup with Wild Rice and Cubed Root Vegetables (also without the wild rice)

Fermented Sauerkraut

Miso (on the side)

Weston A. Price Foundation Cheesecake

Saturday Dinner – Banquet Plated – Asian Fusion

Butternut Squash Soup with Crème Fraiche and Chives

Skirt Steak in Asian Marinade

Soy sauce – on the side Mushrooms and/or Root Veggies

Sautéed Bok Choy

Fermented Kimchi

Persimmon Ice Cream with Fresh Mint and Crispy Pancake Adornments

**********************

Sunday Lunch – Buffet – Grateful Harvest

Raw Milk Cheeses

Artisan Sourdough, Sprouted Breads and Butter

Lavosh Crackers

Chicken Liver Pate

Beet Salad

Pickles and Assorted Fermented Veggies

Whole Fruit

Macaroons

*******************

Fundraiser Breakfast Buffet – Friday, Saturday and Sunday

Soaked Oatmeal – with fixings bar

Milk, Cream, Maple Syrup, Butter, Coconut Butter, Raisins, Honey, Cinnamon

Whole Fresh Fruit

Boiled Pastured Eggs

 

So which one looks more nourishing and satisfying to you?

Photo credit above: corporate monkey

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  • { 24 comments… read them below or add one }

    1 Anonymous November 7, 2008 at 12:13 am

    Dearest Kelly,
    I am, once again, impressed with your ability to condense things down to their finest points.
    The amount of misinformaton piled upon us is tantamount to Mt. Fuji in our backyards.
    I marvel that I came “out of the dark” 3 years ago and it’s taken me three years to incorporate Price’s work into my life. But like Ms.Fallon always acknowledges…..we’ve had 30 years of low fat dogma..and it’s often hard to face new facts.
    Thank you for spreading the word so people can feed their bodies, brains and spirits for a long, healthy life!
    Hugs.
    Karen in California
    karenferguson@compuserve.com

    Reply

    2 Julie November 7, 2008 at 4:38 am

    Thanks for this. What a great comparison and also the menu from the NT conference gives me some good ideas for Thanksgiving. We have much to be thankful for, one of them being that we are no longer on a low fat diet!!!

    Reply

    3 Michigan Mom2three November 7, 2008 at 4:38 am

    Oh WOW. Starking differences aside….. I think I want to go to the WAP Conference next year just so I can EAT! That’s the best buffet lineup I’ve ever seen!!!!!

    Shauna

    Reply

    4 Julie November 7, 2008 at 4:46 am

    PS to my last comment. I just wanted to put in a plug for the Harsch fermenting crock. I’ve been making kraut in it for 4 years now and it is fool proof. I guess seeing the kraut on the menu for the WAP conference reminded me about this incredible kitchen gadget/decor (it is pretty enough to decorate your kitchen) If it wasn’t for Sally Fallon I don’t know if I ever would have heard of it. Last Saturday a friend came over and helped me put up about 10 pounds of kraut. She said she hadn’t had so much fun in years!

    Reply

    5 Kelly the Kitchen Kop November 7, 2008 at 5:27 am

    Good morning, fellow food-freak friends!

    Karen, you’re such an encourager, thank you!

    Julie, where can we get the crock? Is it in NT?

    Shauna, yes, that conference is definitely worth the money!

    Reply

    6 Julie November 7, 2008 at 6:05 am

    The Harsch crock is mentioned in Nourishing Traditions in the resources section, I believe. I found mine on line a at this link:
    http://www.simply-natural.biz/Harsch-Crock-Pot.php#. There are lots of other places on line where a person can get a crock, but I chose this one because it has free shipping. I have the 10 L. size,which is big enough to put up 10 pounds of cabbage. The smallest size is 5 L. The crocks are big and expensive. For sauerkraut I think using the crock is an excellent way, but for other fermented vegetables, I think the quart canning jar works just fine. I make Kim Chee, ginger carrots, fermented onions, beets, corn relish in quart jars.

    Reply

    7 Kelly the Kitchen Kop November 7, 2008 at 6:39 am

    Julie,

    Obviously you must be having good luck with your ferments. I haven’t had time to read any books on it or research it TOO much, but just trying pickles (in a “Perfect Pickler”) has made me scared to try anything else. This bums me out, because that beneficial bacteria is SOOO good for us! (At least we get plenty of raw milk, yogurt, and Kombucha now and then, too.) I just don’t like how the pickles taste – probably my palette is too warped from store-bought and I expect them to taste a certain way, but they just don’t. Can’t get it by the kids, either.

    Any chance you would do a guest post for me with some specifics?????

    Kelly

    Reply

    8 Julie L. November 7, 2008 at 10:04 am

    I feel your pain, Kelly, ma’ friend. We tried Ginger Carrots and I couldn’t get myself to swallow without an audible gag. Wayyyy too salty! Since that was a waste of time and money, I’ve been very reluctant to try fermented veggies again. Has anyone had luck with a specific recipe that even kids would enjoy? Thanks in advance! :)

    –Julie

    Reply

    9 Julie November 8, 2008 at 6:59 am

    Kelly and Julie L.
    I also had bad luck with cucumber pickles. I now buy a fermented brand in the store. The brand is by “Bah Tempte”, look for them in the refrigerated part of the deli. The kind you want is called “Half Sours” and they are great, made in the true NT way. No vinegar is used. I like them because they have that carbonated tang to them.
    The first thing I did when I got nourishing traditions was to start making the fermented vegetables. I figured that if Sally put this chapter first then there must be an important reason. Also, keep in mind that fermented vegetables are used as a condiment, you wouldn’t eat a bowl full! For kids and adults not used to them, start with teeny tiny amounts, a teaspoon or less.
    About the ginger carrots, yes that recipe is way salty. Sally even adjusted it, I think on the WAP website.
    Julie L., to get your kids to try fermented vegetables– make the fermented pearl onions–they turn out good, are a little on the sweet side and you got to admit those baby onions are cute. The corn relish recipe is great! The fruit chutney and the pineapple chutney delicious! Chutneys are a great accompanyment to meats. Don’t give up on the ginger carrots either. I will try to find the adjusted recipe for you. I know it’s out there somewhere!

    Reply

    10 Michigan Mom2three November 8, 2008 at 7:05 am

    I do the ginger carrots and cordito in quart jars, and usually have some in the fridge at all times. I like them really well – but I use them as a CONDIMENT. I wonder if you were trying them as a “vegetable side dish”? NT says they are supposed to be a condiment. The ginger carrots go particularly well with the spicy meatloaf. I will put a tablespoon or so on the side of my plate, and spoon a bit onto each bite. The cordito is great with mexican food – again, a CONDIMENT. A couple teaspoons in a taco, or on enchiladas. NT has a black bean tostada recipe that we love – sprouted tortillas, soaked black beans, cordito, real sour cream (if you can make it, or I just use Daisy brand – the only brand out there with “cultured cream” as it’s one and only ingredient!) and all the fixings.

    You can’t serve the fermented veggies as a side dish and take a “regular bite” though. Way too strong!

    I’m getting a food-grade plastic pail this weekend so I can do up a bunch of saurkraut. (Sam’s will give away their giant 10-gallon frosting containers in the bakery if you ask them!) I have a friend that did her saurkraut in that – and I was over at her house yesterday.

    To make the fermented veggies – I just followed the directions in NT. It isn’t hard. You have to plan ahead and make the whey first. The easiest way to do that is to use the method using the plain whole milk yogurt. (Directions in NT cultured milk chapter)

    Shauna

    Reply

    11 Julie L. November 8, 2008 at 8:34 am

    Thanks Julie and Shauna! Appreciate your input and will be trying again, thanks to your encouragement!

    :) Julie L.

    Reply

    12 Kelly the Kitchen Kop November 8, 2008 at 10:03 am

    I love my readers, have I mentioned that lately? You guys are SO cool. How many people can you "talk" with about this stuff and have them still think you're normal? NOT MANY!

    OK, more comments and questions…

    First, Shauna & Julie, I think you've hit the nail on the head! I've thought of it more as a side dish and not as a condiment, duh! So maybe smaller bites would be more palatable.

    By the way, for those who wonder what we're talking about – fermented foods and beverages help food digest better, along with providing healthy bacteria – a natural whole food probiotic. Super healthy!

    The pineapple chutney I tried once turned me off, though, because, as you would expect with something fermented, it reminded me a little of beer…not a flavor that goes well with pineapple in my opinion, BUT, again, I wasn't thinking of it as a condiment, so I think I'll try it again.

    Shauna, is the Daisy brand sour cream made with whole milk??? I never noticed before until I just looked after reading your comment, that the Horizon organic sour cream is made from cultured "light" cream and NONFAT milk!!!!! I knew Horizon wasn't the best organic brand there is, but I could find it easily at Meijer…looks like I won't be buying THAT anymore, though.

    Julie, can't wait to look for those pickles at the store!

    Thanks again for all this great scoop!

    Kelly

    Reply

    13 Michigan Mom2three November 8, 2008 at 1:56 pm

    I assume that the regular daisy is. The original Daisy lable says this, “Ingredients: Grade A Cultured Cream” That’s IT. Every single other brand out there – even the organic ones, has about 6-8 ingredients, including dry milk, emulsifiers and gums!!!!! I only buy Daisy – I get a big giant tub at Sam’s Club for about $3. The Daisy light adds some other junk – but I don’t buy light anything anyway.

    I know it’s not organic – but in this case, unless I can make my own with raw milk (which, I don’t have enough cream to do……) this is a better alternitive than organic I think. I don’t want any of those gums, emulsifiers, or additives!

    Shauna

    Reply

    14 Kelly the Kitchen Kop November 8, 2008 at 8:44 pm

    You’ve sold me on it, that’s for sure…Meijer had better have it!

    Reply

    15 Michigan Mom2three November 10, 2008 at 4:56 am

    Yeah, they do. That’s where I used to get it until I realized that Sam’s sold a container twice as big as the “big one at Meijer” for the *SAME* price.

    Shauna

    Reply

    16 cheeseslave November 10, 2008 at 10:23 pm

    Haha this is great!

    Do you want to hear something funny? The biggest (actually the ONLY) complaint I heard from folks at the WAPF conference this weekend was that there was “NOT ENOUGH FAT”.

    LOL!

    We wanted more butter, more coconut oil, more cream.

    That said, the food was still AMAZING. So delicious and nourishing.

    Reply

    17 Kelly the Kitchen Kop November 11, 2008 at 10:16 am

    Ann Marie,

    As long as you’re making us jealous, tell us what your favorite meal was at the WAP conference? Go on, let us live through you!

    Others who went, feel free to chime in with your favorites, too!

    Kelly

    Reply

    18 cheeseslave January 6, 2009 at 3:04 pm

    Hey sorry I just saw this. Your old site didn’t have the email feature (which I love).

    You know you should not be jealous of me because I actually didn’t get to eat a lot of the food at this last WAPF conference because I was on GAPS at the time. No cheese, no raw milk, no oatmeal, no ice cream, etc. etc.

    Everything I did eat was phenomenal. My favorite thing was all the raw oysters I ate at the Drake’s Bay oyster booth. Oh, and all the Vital Choice seafood samples. YUM!

    Reply

    19 Kelly January 6, 2009 at 3:46 pm

    OK, you’re *favorite* was the raw oysters….um, I’m not there yet…

    Reply

    20 cheeseslave January 6, 2009 at 3:50 pm

    Have you ever had them?

    With a nice mignonette sauce and some chilled Champagne?

    Mmmmm

    I ate so many at the Drake’s Bay booth, and I was sending so many people over to them, they started giving them to me for free.

    Reply

    21 Kelly January 6, 2009 at 3:57 pm

    No, I’m afraid.

    Reply

    22 Jeanmarie August 9, 2009 at 12:44 am

    I think what happens a lot when people switch to NT-style nutrient-dense eating is that we get enthusiastic and try making stuff and we’re not used to the tastes so can’t tell whether we failed or we just don’t like it. I’m lucky to live in Northern California, which has wonderful lacto-fermented sauerkraut, for instance, available in stores from Cultured Foods in Berkeley. That helped me to know what it was supposed to taste like, as I learn to make it better myself. Plus, their jars are really great so I save them all and use them for my own ferments or just as a food storage jar to avoid plastic.
    It helps a lot to taste well-made examples of this kind of food, and when you do, you just don’t want to go back to regular stuff.

    Reply

    23 KitchenKop August 9, 2009 at 1:48 am

    I’m finally making my own sauerkraut this week!!!

    Reply

    24 Jeanmarie August 9, 2009 at 12:27 pm

    Wow! Terrific! I love adding carrot and apple (preferably Granny Smith, but I’m sure others are nice too) with the cabbage. What recipe are you starting with?

    Reply

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